Convert PHP code into Ruby!
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  • include

    Posted on April 29th, 2009 RubyLove No comments

    The include() statement includes and evaluates a specified file. The difference between include() and require() is that require() results in a Fatal Error upon failure, whereas include() does not, it only produces a Warning.

    include() is not a function in PHP, it is a language construct.

    PHP

    include('../config.php');

    Ruby

    include('../config.rb');
  • require

    Posted on April 26th, 2009 RubyLove No comments

    The require() statement includes and evaluates a specified file. The difference between require() and include() is that require() results in a Fatal Error upon failure, whereas include() does not, it only produces a Warning.

    require() is not a function in PHP, it is a language construct.

    PHP

    require ('../config.php');

    Ruby

    require ('../config.rb');
  • printf

    Posted on April 23rd, 2009 RubyLove 1 comment

    Output a formatted string.

    PHP

    $format = 'There are %d monkeys in the %s';
    printf($format, 5, 'tree');
    // => There are 5 monkeys in the tree

    Ruby

    my_string = 'There are %d monkeys in the %s';
    printf(my_string, 5, 'tree');
    # => There are 5 monkeys in the tree
  • print

    Posted on April 20th, 2009 RubyLove No comments

    Output a string.

    Strictly speaking, print() is not a function in PHP, it is a language construct (similar to echo() ).

    PHP

    print 'Hello World!';
    // => Hello World!

    Ruby

    print 'Hello World!'
    # => Hello World!
  • echo

    Posted on April 17th, 2009 RubyLove 2 comments

    Output one or more strings.

    Strictly speaking, echo() is not a function in PHP, it is a language construct.

    PHP

    echo 'Hello World!';
    // => Hello World!

    Ruby

    print 'Hello World!'
    # => Hello World!
  • sort

    Posted on April 14th, 2009 RubyLove No comments

    Sorts an array with elements arranged from lowest to highest.

    PHP

    $a = array('a', 'b', 'e', 'g', 'c', 'd');
    sort($a);
    print_r($a);
    /*
    Array (
    	[0] => a
    	[1] => b
    	[2] => c
    	[3] => d
    	[4] => e
    	[5] => g
    )
    */

    Ruby

    a = [ "d", "a", "e", "c", "b" ];
    puts a.sort;
    # => ["a", "b", "c", "d", "e"]
  • count

    Posted on April 11th, 2009 RubyLove No comments

    Returns the number of elements in an array.

    PHP

    $a = array('first' => 1, 'second' => 2);
    echo count($a);
    // => 2

    Ruby

    my_array = [1, 2];
    puts my_array.length;
    # => 2
  • array_key_exists

    Posted on April 8th, 2009 RubyLove No comments

    Returns TRUE if the given argument is set in the array. The argument passed in can be any value possible for an array index.

    PHP

    $a = array('first' => 1, 'second' => 2);
    var_dump( array_key_exists('first', $a) );
    // => true

    Ruby

    animals = {:sheep => 1, :cow => 2};
    puts animals.include?(:cow);
    # => true
  • array_sum

    Posted on April 5th, 2009 RubyLove 2 comments

    Returns the sum of values in an array.

    PHP

    $a = array(2, 4, 6, 8);
    echo array_sum($a);
    // => 20

    Ruby

    a_var = [2, 4, 6, 8];
    puts a_var.inject {|sum,x| sum ? sum + x : x };
    # => 20

    In the code above, the return value from the ruby code will be nil if the array used is empty. This is not exactly the same behaviour as PHP, since the array_sum() function will always return a number. We can force ruby to always return a float (or an int) too, even if the array is empty, by adding a bit of type casting to the final result:

    Ruby

    a_var = [];
    puts a_var.inject {|sum,x| sum ? sum + x : x }.to_f;
    # => 0.0
  • pi

    Posted on April 2nd, 2009 RubyLove No comments

    Returns the value of PI to 14 (default) decimal places. This precision can be altered in the php.ini file.

    PHP

    echo pi();
    // => 3.1415926535898

    Ruby

    puts Math::PI;
    # => 3.14159265358979

    In the code above, PI is actually a constant of the Module Math. PHP also has a constant which stores the approximate value of PI - M_PI.

    PHP

    echo M_PI();
    // => 3.1415926535898